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Fillable Printable Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Example

Fillable Printable Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Example

Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Example

Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Example

Faculty & Research
CME
R
Center for the Management of Environmental Resources
Balanced Scorecard and Sustainability:
Examples from Literature and Practice
by
F. Zingales
and
K. Hockerts
2003/30/CMER
Working Paper Series
Balanced Scorecard & Sustainability:
Examples from literature and practice
Francesco G.G. Zingales & Kai Hockerts
Published in: Schaltegger, S. & Dyllick, T. (2002): Nachhaltig managen mit der Balanced Scorecard. Konzept
und Fallstudien. Wiesbaden: Gabler, pp. 151 – 166, [English Version].
Table of contents
1.1
Introduction....................................................................................................... 1
1.1.1Examples from the literature review......................................................... 1
1.1.2Examples from the practice....................................................................... 4
1.1.3Conclusions............................................................................................. 11
Bibliography............................................................................................................... 13
Interviews & Presentations......................................................................................... 13
1.1 Introduction
As a part of this project our role was to survey the literature and the practice to find examples of integration of
environmental and social indicators in the Balanced Scorecard. In order to do this effectively we divided the
survey in two distinct parts. The first part was concerned with the literature and the practice on the Balanced
Scorecard as such. What organisational issues lead firms to turn to the Balanced Scorecard? Did the Balanced
Scorecard solve these problems effectively? Details on this first part are available in Zingales, O’Rourke &
Hockerts (2001). The second part was more specifically focused on integration of environmental and social
issues within Corporate Scorecards. It is this second part that we concentrate and describe thoroughly throughout
this Section.. As we will see, the literature, apart from a couple of exceptions has not been exploring this issue in
much depth nor volume. The search for examples through direct interviews was thus more successful and
provides with a good basis for the discussion of the theory proposed in the previous chapters as well as a
benchmark for the Case Studies analysed within this project.
1.1.1Examples from the literature review
Broadly speaking the four main BSC books (Brown 1996, Olve et al 1999, Kaplan & Norton 1996, 2001) are not
especially focusing on environmental and social issues but simply bringing to the reader examples of Corporate
BSCs. Even though each of them mentions occasionally environmental issues they do not provide with examples
of integration. On the other hand in the environmental management literature we found four authors to have
taken some features of the BSC to surface the value of environmental programs (Johnson 1996, Radcliffe 1999,
Epstein &Wisner 2001, Nilsson 2001). The first two however only discuss the issue in theory. Thus in Section
1.1.1 and 1.1.2 we will comment the only two ‘live’ examples that we could find namelyBristol Myers Squibb
(Epstein & Wisner, 2001) and Telia(Nilsson, 2001).
1.1.1.1 Bristol Myers Squibb
In their theoretical discussion Epstein & Wisner (2001) focus specifically on the integration of environmental
issues in the Corporate BSC. Their underlying definition of integration seems to be something like
demonstrating how environmental and social issues contribute to corporate profitability”. Their elaboration of
this point is however not too deep. Their empirical-anecdotal evidence relates to the Scorecard of the Health
Safety and the Environment department of Bristol Myers Squibb (see Table 1). In other words while their
theoretical discussion relates to the integration of the environmental and social issues with the business their
main example relates to the use of the BSC tool for the measurement of a Shared Service Unit – the one
incharged of overseeing the Health Safety and Environment issues in the whole Corporation. The very
characteristic of these types of Units (e.g. Environment, Information technology, Human Resources), which
usually sit at corporate level, is to be used as internal service providers
1
Table 1 Example of Bristol Myers Squibb S&E. Performance objectives and measures
Financial
Perspective
Customer
Perspective
Internal Process
Perspective
Learning & Growth
perspective
- Cost Savings
- $ Saved from
accident reduction
- $ saved from PLC
reviews
- Investments
- $ Spent on EH&S
capital projects
- Remediation costs
- Prevenative costs
- Community
improvements
- Revenues
- Sales of S&E friendly
products
- External customer
Support
- Product safety
- Post-consumer
waste recycled
- Consumer education
- # Product safety
brochures
distributed
- Goop Citizenship
- # Awards
- Philantropic
contributions
- Product donations
- Environmental
Performance
- Water use
- Packaging
reduction
- % Solvents
recycled
- Energy use
- Hazardous waste
generated
- # supplier reviews
- # fines
- Worker exposure
- Employee
performance
- # Lost workdays
- Work-related
injuries-illnesses
- Employee practices
- Training hours
- Ergonomic reviews
- Diversity
- Transfer of Best
Practices
- # ISO 14001
certifications
- # Product life cycle
reviews
to the Business Units. They are not, by nature, integrated with the Businesses. The very problem for corporations
today is in fact their lack of integration. This suggests that building such an HSE BSC without understanding its
interaction with the various Businesses (or product lines) might be only an apparently useful exercise.
Unfortunately, besides providing the example the authors do not comment on the specific use of this BSC.
Questions like: Why was it put together? How does it help? What does it add compared to an ISO 14031?
Remain unanswered. Without the example of Novartis(See Section 1.2.2) - where we were able to access first
hand information - we would be left with very little to say except making rather sterile hypothesis. We will thus
leave a more detailed discussion on the usefulness of an HSE BSC to that later section.
1.1.1.2 Telia Nära Linköping
Telia Nära Linköping (Telia NL) is a business unit of Telia AB, a Swedish company active in the wireless
industry. As described by Nilsson (2001) this Business Unit had been using a Balanced Scorecard for several
years already. In our view this action research project relates much more closely to the idea of integrating the
environmental and social indicators in a Balanced Scorecard. Nilsson interprets integration in a more elaborate
fashion than Epstein and Wisner. Despite the fact she does not give anyexplicit definition her discussion seems
to suggest that environmental issues will be integrated in the business units only when the causes and the effects
of actions that relate to the environmental performance are explicitly mapped and their indicators tracked as part
of the business unit scorecard.
Nilsson explores this hypothesis starting from a single ‘environmental’ project trying to detail how it contributes
to the improvement of specific Telia NL Balanced Scorecard key success factors. The project was called the
Virtual Meetings (VM) Project. Virtual meetings are defined as meetings that would take place through the use
of video/audio conferencing and web casting. The project was ‘sold’ to the outside world as ‘environmental’
because the use of Virtual meetings would reduce travelling and, as a consequence also reduce both from
travelling costs emissions to air. An additional motivation (or perhaps the main one) for the VM project was that
Telia wanted expertise and technology to manage virtual meetings to become an asset of the company that could
be sold to their clients in the future. Telia would pilot the pros and cons internally in order to improve the
product and provide a showcase for the marketing (Nilsson 2001, p.47). On a Corporate point of view these two
explanations can be complemented, and indeed it seems to be an excellent example of a win-win situation (i.e.
that would benefit the bottom line and the environment at the same time). But let us see what happened in Telia
NL.
In order to come up with the map shown in Table 2 Nilsson went through a three step process. Firstly a tentative
list of strategic objectives and relative indicators was drawn from previous research on drivers and barriers to
the use of virtual meetings. Secondly the list was discussed with a core group in each firm during a three-hour
brainstorming session. During this session the proposed strategic objectives of the virtual meeting project (e.g.
awareness building) were revised and prioritised and a number of ones added. Thirdly with the assistance of a
criteria list drawn from the literature Nilsson evaluated whether some of the indicators related to these strategic
objectives could be integrated in the existing Balanced Scorecards of Telia NL.
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Table XX2The Balanced Scorecard of Telia Nära Linköping and existing key success factors as well as
key success factors relatedto the virtual meetings
Perspectives
Key success factors
Telia Nära
Key success factors of the
virtual meeting-projects
Economic efficiency Cut costs
Follow up costs and display savings
Managerial meeting behaviour
Reliance
Visualisation
Availability
Using virtual meetings more internally
Market CapitalFocus on the most
important customers
(companies and larger
accounts)
Loyal customers
Win back important
customers lost
Human Capital Competent and motivated
staff
Follow up time
and display savings
Awareness building
Training
As shown in Table 2 the strategic objectives of virtual meetings– developed during the project - are put in
relation through cause-effect linkages with the strategic objectives of Telia NL. The visualisation of the links
shows how the virtual meeting project has the potential to both decrease costs (through decreased travelling) and
increase motivation of staff (through training and awareness building). Interestingly no reference to the possible
corporate implications of this project (i.e. new product development) arises from this map. We don’t know why
this feature was omitted. We can only say that its absence is reducing the richness of insight provided by the
map. In other words we could even make the extreme hypothesis that anything left out of such a map becomes
inexistent and ‘disappears’. This consideration, on the other hand, points to the powerfulness of visualisation and
maps, an issue to consider carefully for future studies.
Another interesting consideration from this case arises from the choice of putting in relation the strategic
objectives instead of the indicators. Managers and researchers made this specific choice together during their
working groups. The author explains that it is overly complex to design cause-effect relationships between
indicators because they are often expressed through mathematical formulas containing several parameters
(Nilsson 2001, p.45). Again, unfortunately we lack further insight on the matter, but an alternative explanation
for not linking the measures is that Business Unit managers really did not want extra indicators to deal with. In
this respect anything that does not bear an explicit relation with the measures might be seen as peripheral to the
core of the business and be discarded when the research project is over. Some important questions arise from this
discussion: is the fact of not linking the indicators acceptable? If so, how to evaluate the effect of the project on
the business? Is it always necessary to do so? For the moment we leave these questions as inspiration for future
action-based projects.
Following on the usefulness of maps one important issue seemed to be that drawing these maps was complicated
and required the presence of many actors (e.g. top managers, controller, environmental manager) in a group
discussion. According to the participants to the research project the main value of this exercise was the
visualisation of the links in a one-page document, which provided with an excellent platform for discussion.
The interest of this example lies mainly in the use of the existing BSC as the platform for discussion of the
relevance of a project (i.e. the virtual meetings project) that would have financial, motivational and
environmental benefits. The use of cause-effect linkages being the main feature that visualises the relationship
between the project and the strategy of the firm. The main outcome of this effort was the difficulty of inserting
new indicators in a BSC. This problem was strongly felt by Nilsson in her study.
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There are two ways of interpreting this difficulty. The first and simplest is that indicators about a single project
do not needto be part of the general BSC. In the BSC methodology “projects” are actions that stem from the
definition of an objective, its specific indicator(s) and a target achievement in a given time horizon. Virtual
meetings, by reducing travelling expenses automaticallyqualifyas a good project because (among other things)
contribute to the Telia NL strategic objective of “cutting costs”. There is thus no need for “separate” indicators to
be integrated explicitly in the BSC. Simply the monitoring of the Virtual meeting project will be done through
indicators of cost reduction and the project will be judged successful if a certain target is achieved. All of these
indicators will be part of the BSC because they are included in the total result that Telia NL achieves in “cutting
costs”.
The second is a more indirect and general comment that relates to the absence of links (or maps) between
indicators in Telia NL original BSC. It is our opinion that the absence of an explicit hypothesis about causes and
effect hinders that possibility of discussing whether that hypothesis is proven by facts. In other words if the
management team had made an hypothesis that an increased costumer satisfaction would lead to higher sales and
achieves the first but not the second it could be that (i) the definitions and parameters of costumer satisfaction
were wrong and need to be revised (ii) the measuring technique was ineffective and needs to be improved (iii)
the total size of the market has shrunk. We argue thatit will not be possible to discuss these possibilities whilst
enhancing learning without the hypothesis being made in the first place. This misuse of the BSC might end up
with measures that are ‘set in stone’. We do not know whether this was an important issue in the case of Telia
NL, but the resistance experienced by Nilsson in inserting new indicators in the BSC could be an indication of
this problem. The relevance of this issue for environmental/sustainability professionals should not be
underestimated. In fact, to the extreme, this means that if you are not at the table when the first BSC is built you
have very scarce chances of getting in later.
All in all we found this Case very interesting because of the richness in insight that provided in the description of
exactly what were the problems and the issues at the different stages of the research. Action-based research
seems to provide the right means both to gather relevant data and to provoke managers into desired discussions.
1.1.2 Examples from the practice
Given the relatively scarce evidence we found in the literature we turned to the practice in search for primary
data. In order to short list a number of companies we used the literature surveyed to identify companies that
might be worth interviewing. The companies in Table 3 have two things in common (i) they are documented to
be using the Balanced Scorecard (ii) they are carrying out environmental and social programs that go beyond
legislative requirements. We thought that for these companies the likelihood of finding some
environmental/social indicators in their BSCs would’ve been higher than in a random sample.
Table XX3. List of companies attempted contact
Source Companies mentioned
Kaplan And Norton (a)
Book: The Balanced Scorecard (1996)
Dupont, General Electric, Hewlett-Packard, Shell Canada.
Olve et al.
Book : Performance Drivers (1998)
ABB, British Airways, British Telecom, Coca-Cola Beverages
- Sweden, Electrolux, Skandia, Volvo, Xerox
Epstein 2000
Book: Counting What Counts (2000)
Whirlpool, Cigna Property & Casualty, Bank of Montreal,
Skandia.
Kaplan and Norton (b)
Book: The Strategy Focused Organization (2001)
Nova Scotia Power, AT&T Canada (now Equifax),
Wintherthur International.
Other Sources (mainly attempts from tips) Statoil, Telia, Skanska, Unilever, BP Chemicals
4
Given the internal nature of the BSC tool we needed to get in touch with people within the company that
participated (or coached) the implementation of the BSC. This proved to be much harder than we had
anticipated. In the end we succeeded in carrying out teninterviews with the following companies: ABB Sweden,
British Telecom, Lunds Energi, Novartis, Nova Scotia Power, Novo Nordisk, Shell, Skandia, SwissRe, Xerox
Sweden. Most of them could provide us with interesting insights on the use of the Balanced Scorecard (see
Zingaleset al. 2001) but only four companies were able to show us that they had integrated environmental and/or
social indicators in their BSCs namelyLunds Energi, Novartis, Novo Nordisk and Shell. The following four
sections are dedicated to presenting and discussing each of these four cases.
1.1.2.1 Lunds Energi
Lunds Energi provides the city of Lund in Southern Sweden with electricity, heating and water services. Lunds
Energi, wholly owned by the municipality, apparently did not have any specific organizational problem
pressuring themto implement a BSC. Simply they were looking for better ways to measure performance and
plan their work (Parker, 2002). Mr. Parker perception is that the process of building the BSC provided with an
excellent platform to discuss milestones of projects before the project would end. This would in turn highlight
problems early on and increase the chances of projects to deliver successful results.
On an environmental management point of view however the use of the BSC has created a rather dangerous
situation. The same manager that implemented in earlier times the Health Safety and Environment management
systems was also the one incharged of coaching the BSC process. He thinks that in reality implementing the BSC
has the potential to damage the environmental work in the long run. Lunds Energi had been working for years
with their EMS as part of the engagements the firms has with its owner (i.e. Lund Municipality) and its clients
(i.e. Lunds citizens). With the implementation of the BSC Lunds Energi is charged with far too many goals and
projects (i.e. the ones from the EMS and the ones from the BSC). None of the goals is well followed up because
there are too many. Even though some environmental measures are present in Lunds Energi Corporate (and
Business Unit) BSCs he strongly believes that an increased understanding of the interaction between BSC and
EMS objectives should be sought. His personal feeling and fear is that a failure in this sense might, in the long
run, reduce the total environmental effort of Lunds Energi simply because resources will be more and more
allocated based on what is found in the BSC. [Parker, 16 April 2002, Lecture].
In other words generalizing this finding we might have companies that manage the environmental and social
issues very proactively through environmental (and social) management systems whose programs are downsized
because of the implementation of the BSC. The downsizing effect seems to relate more to the lack of capacity of
integration between the environmental and the financial control systems rather than the actual questioning of the
strategic relevance of environmental and social issues for the firm. How should environmental and financial
control systems interact? This is a question Lunds Energi is today trying to tackle in the practice and another
interesting theme for future research.
1.1.2.2 Novartis
Novartis is a large pharmaceutical company with Corporate offices in Switzerland with sales of roughly 19
billion USD. The firm as a whole is not using the BSC. The Corporate HSE department used the BSC to measure
their performance. As it is easy to understand, this is a particularly daunting task in a setting like Novartis where
the HSE department and its five people sitting at corporate level have to manage a large network of HSE
practitioners each in different levels of different business units. The Corporate HSE group was looking for a tool
that would allow them to have a closer contact with the management of the business units and not only with their
HSE delegates. The BSC in Figure 1 is the result of this work and the way the HSE department will evaluate -
and be evaluated for - the success of its efforts.
Again, as for Bristol Myers Squibb, given the very high aggregation level, little is left of the link between HSE
issues and the strategy of the different business units. It seems that this BSC serves more to manage in a more
coherent fashion Corporate HSE rather than explicitly linking HSE to the core of the business. Nevertheless the
Corporate HSE Manager included the Business Unit managers in the discussion when defining the objectives
and the indicators in their Scorecard. According to him this increased their understanding of the relevance HSE
issues for their businesses (Eigenmann, 31
st
May 2002, Presentation). The next steps in Novartis are related to
breaking down the Corporate HSE BSC into Business Unit HSE BSCs.
5
The four perspectives of the HSE BSC are broadly following the BSC standard structure. The High Performance
Organisation relates to the capacity and satisfaction of the employees of the HSE department (equivalent to
Development and Growth). The perspective Systematic Execution & implementation of HSE requirements
objectives relates to the idea that the main role of the HSE network (i.e. corporate and business units HSE
professionals) is to readily provide HSE information/knowledge to the business units when required (equivalent
to Internal Processes). The perspective Stakeholder Service Excellence is the equivalent of the Costumer
perspective but enlarged to a much broader set of key stakeholders. Finally the perspective Excellence in
Financial Performance seems to be a mixture of internal efficiency measures where the link with the financial
performance of the firm is not explicit.
6
To implement Health, Safety and Environment into our businessesand be recognized by internal and external stakeholders and interested parties as a leader committed to achieving
a superior level of HSE for our employees, consumers and customers
Novartis Health, Safety and Environment Balanced Scorecard
Novartis HSE Vision
Strategies
nMaintain and further develop a high performance worldwide HSE organization, which acquires and leverages global know-how to identify, support andaddress the needsof our
business
nIntegrate HSE into our businesses using consistent standards,appropriatetechnology, best in class practices, and knowledge access and sharing
nCreate an HSE network using internal and external resources effectively, providing flexible, competent and responsive servicesto our businesses at a competitive cost
nBuild andmaintain relationships with various governmental, regulatoryand interested party groups protecting our stakeholder interest
High Performance
Organization
Excellence in Financial
Performance
Systematic Execution &
Implementation of HSE
Requirements
Stakeholder Service
Excellence
nEnsure appropriate structures and
resourcesexist within the corporate, sector
and site organizations
nProvide a working environment which
fosters cooperation, teamwork
communication and innovation
nEstablish and enhance employee
motivation and commitment while
continuously develop knowledge and
leverage employee strengths
nAttract and retain key employees for
Novartis
nIntegration of HSE intoline
organizations
nSupport setting of
appropriate targets to
address business needs
nProper risk management
nAvoidance of claims
nImprovements in operational
performance; safety,
resources and assets
nEnsure communication channels
and lines of responsibility are
efficient, clear and used properly
nEnsure relevant guidelines,
policies and tools exist, are
updated timely and consistently
followed
nAllow for easy storage, access,
compilation and disseminationof
data, know-how and experience
nContinuously interactwith internal and
external stakeholders to understand and
meet their needs while enhancing the
reputation of Novartis
nEnsure guidelines are understood
throughout the organization and enhance
processes through spreading of best
practices andknow-how sharing
nEnsure internal and external inquiriesand
issues are addressedtimely, accurately
and thoroughly
nProvide feedback and recommendations
to internal stakeholders regarding
performance and compliance with
guidelines and standards to improve our
businesses
Objectives/Critical Success Factors
nHSE Employee Satisfaction
Score
nTraining Compliance Rate
nHSE Employee Retention Rate
nSuccessful Job Rotation Rate
nTarget Achievement Rate
nRisk Management Score
nExternal/Internal Resource Rate
nHSE Expense Spending
nHSE Performance Score
nAudit Recommendation
Implementation Score
nHSE Implementation Score
nInformation Sharing Score
nExternal Rating Score
nLine Management Satisfaction Score
nQuestion Response/Advise Rate
nBusiness Improvement Rate
nKey External Stakeholder Relationship
Score
Key Performance Indicators
Fig. 1. Novartis Corporate Health Safety and the Environment Scorecard
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1.1.2.3 Novo Nordisk
Novo Nordisk is a Danish pharmaceutical company producing mainly drugs for diabetes care with annual sales
of 900 million Euros. Given their large investments in people and R&D (i.e. intangible & long term investments)
the CEO felt that he needed a way to understand if they were going in the right direction before this would show
up in the financials. Novo Nordisk turned to the BSC five years ago for this very purpose. The integration of
environmental and social parameters within the BSC was partly due to the culture of the company and partly
pushed by events in the business environment that highlighted the relevance of global inequity issues for the
business of pharmaceutical companies. In Table 4 we can see what the Balanced Scorecard of Corporate Novo
Nordisk looks like today.
Table 4: Novo Nordisk Balanced Scorecard 2002.
Customers & Society Finance
- Realise the full potential of strategic products
-
Improve market share globally
-
Ensure successful implementation of US and
Japanese Business plan
-
Achieve superior costumer satisfactions
- Improve social, environmental and bioethical
performance
- Growth in Operation Profit
- ROIC
- Operating Margin
- Cash to Earnings Ratio
Business Processes People & Organization
- Discovery speed quality and productivity
- Competitive development portfolio
- Ensure launch capabilities within GP
segment
- Improve quality management focus in all
business processes
- Timely and efficient execution of investment
portfolio
- Ensure effective use of IT supporting the
business strategies
- Costumer Relations
-
Winning culture
-
Attract and retain the best
-
Development of people
-
Social responsibility
Environmental and social issues are integrated explicitly in Costumers & Society and in the People &
Organisation perspectives. According to the Corporate Sustainability VP environmental targets are also present
in the Internal Process perspective within the categories of productivity and quality. These general objectives are
cascaded through the organization. The system is managed through software and Novo Nordisk external (triple
bottom line) reporting is a result of the data gathered through it. Furthermore bonuses of managers are based on
the criteria outlined in the BSC. The general objectives are then coupled with relevant indicators and agreed
targets. In Table 4 we find the follow up table related to the perspective People & Organization.
8
Table 5: Example of KPIs for Social issues in Novo Nordisk
CSF CSF - Rationale KPI Target ‘02 Resp.
Attraction &
Retention
High retention of
employees will secure
our knowledge and
competitive advantage
Reduction of
unwanted turnover in
selected units
- X%XY
Development of
People
Development of people
is a key objective for
managers
N. of managers with
development of people
as a personal target
… XX
Costumer
Relations
Improving CR is
essential for improving
sustainable business
results
N. of dialogues
between patients and
employees
Winning culture Developing a Winning
culture will help us
strive for stretch targets
N. of team targets
Social
Responsibility
Increase equal
opportunities and
diversity throughout the
entire company
N. of plans for
increasing equal
opportunities
The department that champions environmental and social issues in Novo Nordisk is called the Stakeholder
Relations (SR) Department. The top manager of this department is a member of the executive committee. The
SR department also has a BSC as shown in Table 5. The attempt to relate to the Corporate BSC is only implicit
(i.e. no graphical representation of the relationship). As we understand it the SR BSC seems to take three ‘routes’
to bring value to the firm (i) Enhance the quality of the SR dialogue with external stakeholders (ii) Enhance the
SR capacity to find effective and efficient ways to bring these issues to top management (iii) Enhance the SR
capacity to bring these issues down to the business unit level.
Table 6 Novo Nordisk Stakeholder Relations Balanced Scorecard 2002.
Customers & Society Finance
- Enable Management to manage issues &
trends with implications for the Triple Bottom
Line
- Drive and continually challenge NN
performance on the TBL
- Protect and Enhance NN’s reputation and
long term brand value
- Exploit and develop NN’s position as a global
leader in TBL reporting and accounting
- Fulfill the business plan 02-03
Deliver Value for money by :
- Ensure that SR projects support NN
business strategies and competitiveness on
existing as well as emerging markets
- Continuously ensure the SR Annual Budget
efficiency through prioritization/evaluation
- Meet the adjusted Annual Budget 2002
- Focus on planning & synergies in the SR
projects
Business Processes People & Organization
- Work towards full business integration,
including embedding NN’s TBL
approach/commitment in the entire
organization through :
- Develop tools for implementing TBL issues
- Monitor the NN performance & quality of TBL
processes, targets, data and documentation
- Utilize TBL trend spotting & risk management
in the decision making process
- Use project management to optimize
efficiency and quality
- Ensure efficient use of IT
- Costumer Increase dialogue and integration
with the NN business areas :
- Costumer/partner relations
- Develop a learning organization and a
winning culture :
- Attract, retain and develop people
- Nurture diversity of professional skills
through social responsibility and equal
opportunities
In the Case of Novo Nordisk there is a strong push from the top to have social and environmental targets
integrated at every level of the company. This commitment is evident in the Corporate BSC. The way forward in
this field for Novo Nordisk is described as follows by the VP of Stakeholder relations “We need to go more to
the external stakeholders to seek information. We also would like to see more sustainability issues on the BSC.
Especially important is however getting further down in the business with the BSC work. We are now only at a
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